Seattle Parks to See the Space Needle

Seattle Space Needle

I got lucky when I arrived in Seattle on Sunday-there was sunshine. Even in early November, the leaves were still peeking, bursting with bright yellow and orange.  One of the key differences between the Pacific Northwest in the south was that despite the colder temperatures, the amount of rain throughout the year kept the grass and the fir trees extremely green. That, contrasted with the gray skies and bright orange foliage, made for beautiful photos. 

I always thought of Seattle’s iconic landmark as the Space Needle. While I didn’t get a chance to go up to the top, I found plenty of parks where I could see the Space Needle from afar.

Photo taken at Kerry Park
Photo taken at Kerry Park

Seattle Parks where you can see the Space Needle:

Magnolia Park and Discovery Park

These two linear parks sat on a hillside in a residential part of town. Puget Sound was viewable from one side of the park, while you had a distant view of Seattle’s skyline from the crest of the hill. Many cyclist ride through the surrounding neighborhoods, as it is good for hills and lower traffic than the city.

The view from Magnolia Park
The view from Magnolia Park

Interlaken Park

Just over Capitol Hill, tucked into a cute neighborhood, Interlaken Park, features a network of wooded trails.The trails significantly change in elevation, with man-made stairs built into the hills to conquer the steep dips and rises. It seems like this park stays very wet throughout the year, as ferns and moss were thriving in its bowl-like valley. Cyclists enjoy riding the winding road that cuts through the park. 

Interlaken Park
The trails that wind through Interlaken Park

Kerry Park

If you want a picturesque view of Seattle’s skyline, Kerry Park is the place to be, located at the peak of  the Queen Anne neighborhood. The park is more of an brick overlook, complete with a view of Elliott Bay, the Central City, Space Needle and occasionally Mount Rainier.

Panorama taken from Kerry Park
Panorama taken from Kerry Park

Olympic Sculpture Park

I ran through the Olympic Sculpture Park, and found that you can see the Space Needle almost directly from below one of the pedestrian bridges. The Seattle Art Museum curates the current and visiting exhibitions throughout the 9-acre park. You can combine a good running route through both the Sculpture Park and Myrtle Edwards Park, for a scenic run along the Puget Sound.

Gas Works Park

The rusted remains of the former Gas Light Company gasification plant are a sight to see, especially from atop the park’s bright green hill. From the hilltop, you can see across Lake Union, and yup, the Space Needle. On Seattle’s bleakest days, the hill stands out and almost glows, and is an even more beautiful contrast to the dark brownish orange of the gas plant. You can walk through the gasification plant, and it’s easy to see why many parkour fans choose to play in the area, despite its written warnings of ‘no climbing’ everywhere.

Gas Works Park

The hill at Gas Works Park
The hill at Gas Works Park

Volunteer Park

Okay, so you can’t see the Space Needle here, but the 48-acre park in Capitol Hill has a network of paved trails, several green spaces, the Volunteer Park Conservatory, and the Seattle Asian Art Museum.

This fancy castle-looking structure is actually Volunteer Park's water tower.
This fancy castle-looking structure is actually Volunteer Park’s water tower.